Going Off-Grid with a Solar Panel System: What You Need to Know

There are many ways to use solar panels, and the best option will depend on your energy consumption habits and electricity tariffs. You can have a grid-tied installation that only reduces your power bills when the sun is shining, or you can install a solar battery system that can be used after sunset. It’s also possible to design an off-grid solar power system that is fully independent from external energy sources besides the sun.

via Paradise Solar Energy

However, keep in mind that the design and installation process changes depending on the type of solar system you’re looking for. To make sure you get the best possible results, your requirements and expectations should be explained clearly to solar installers before asking for quotes.

As you might expect, the price of solar power systems changes depending on their complexity and features. A basic grid-tied system with a 10-kilowatt capacity is much more affordable than a 10-kilowatt system with a home battery and smart energy monitoring, even when the solar panel capacity is equal in both cases.

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Best High Efficiency Solar Panels for Homes in 2022: Pros and Cons

Solar has been one of the fastest-moving industries over the last decade, which is why it can be difficult to know where to start when shopping for the best solar panels for your home, and how to make important decisions while weighing your options.

Residential rooftop solar panels installed on the south-facing side of the roof on a two-story house.

To help homeowners in the United States and beyond, we’ve developed this guide, which explores everything you need to know about today’s best high efficiency solar panels designed for residential use.

Now that you’ve decided to take the first step to lower your home’s carbon footprint and utility expenses, it is time to find the right solar panels, equipment, and installer to carry out the job.

Table of Contents:

Understanding High-Efficiency Solar Panels

First, let’s begin with sufficient information to bring even the newest solar panel novices up to speed.

It doesn’t take an expert to recognize that “high-efficiency” solar panels imply a high-quality product, but the term has somewhat lost its true meaning as every reputable manufacturer claims that their solar panels are “high-efficiency.”

The efficiency rating of a solar panel is expressed as a percentage and indicates the efficiency with which a given panel can generate usable electricity from direct sunlight.

Majority of solar panels available on the market today are rated for 15% to 20% solar energy conversion efficiency. However, there are also ultra-premium residential PV panels from companies like SunPower, LG, and Panasonic that achieve energy conversion efficiency ratings of 20% to 23%.

In the context of this guide, we refer to high-performance solar modules with efficiency ratings between 19% and 23% as high-efficiency panels.

Did you know? All solar panels lose efficiency and degrade over time. When looking at a specific solar panel, we are not only concerned with the initial efficiency rate but also with how well that initial efficiency will be retained over time. – This is known as the solar panel efficiency degradation rate. The slower a specific panel’s performance degrades over time the more premium and valuable it is.

Most premium, high-efficiency and high-power home solar panels on the market today will retain at least 85% of their initial conversion efficiency at the 25-year mark, while the best of breed panels will retain over 90% of the initial efficiency at the 25-year mark.

When a given solar panel harnesses the sunlight and produces electricity, its actual efficiency performance will vary based on the ambient temperature aka the air temperature of the panel’s immediate surroundings, shade, cloudiness, weather conditions, and sun angle/conditions.

While low-efficiency solar panels may work for yard lights or calculators, midrange to high-power efficiency modules are entirely necessary when considering most home installations with limited rooftop space.

So, while many solar salesmen are eager to tout their “high-efficiency” panels, it is important to recognize that every reputable residential solar company should exclusively install high-quality solar panels with efficiency rating that are appropriate for your home’s needs — for a worthwhile renewable energy investment.

What are High-Efficiency Solar Panels?

Today, monocrystalline PERC and N-type IBC solar cells have been developed for efficiencies of 18% to 20% and above. This has set the new standard for high-efficiency residential solar panels of the future, as commercially available panels are beginning to exceed 20% to 22% peak operating efficiencies.

More so, extensive research is being conducted into photovoltaic (PV) solar energy, with new technologies debuting constantly at high-efficiency ratings. For instance, InsoLight has recently unveiled hyper-efficient solar panel designs with working efficiencies of over 30%.

Monocrystalline Solar Cells vs. Polycristalline

Today, most high-efficiency solar panels utilize monocrystalline solar cells, not polycrystalline. However, there are some decent quality polycrystalline solar panels like the ones from Trina Solar that can achieve efficiencies of over 17%, making them an affordable and economical choice for some of the more-spacious and larger-sized residential rooftops.

Solar Industry Jargon: “Poly” or “mono” for short, mono cells are generally more efficient than poly cells but they are also usually significantly more expensive.

Relatively speaking, solar panels can be considered highly efficient if they are sold with a manufacturer’s efficiency rating above 17%. What this means is that the solar cells within the panel can convert 17% of the energy from sunlight that hits the panel’s surface area.

While 17 percent Sunlight-to-Electricity conversion efficiency rate may not sound like a lot, it is important to understand that all energy conversions experience some energy loss, and that the amount of sunlight that earth receives is truly abundant! 😊

For our guide’s purposes, we define high-efficiency solar panels as those with efficiency ratings of 19% or higher and efficiency degradation rates of 85% or higher at the 25-year mark.

Note that we’ve also included Jinko Solar on our list of the most efficient solar panels in spite of Jinko solar panels having only about 81% of their initial efficiency remaining after 25 years in service.

However, our view is that Jinko’s relatively high initial efficiency rate and their superior value pricing, make Jinko solar panels a compelling option for budget conscious homeowners.

Our view and that of the industry is that premium quality panels will degrade at a slower rate than basic or midrange panels.

Here are the top 11 most efficient solar panels and brands to consider for home solar power system installations:

Rank Make Model Power Efficiency 25-year Efficiency
1 SunPower Maxeon 3 400 W 22.6 % 92 %
2 LG Neon R 405 W 22.3 % 92.5 %
3 REC Alpha 405 W 21.9 % 92 %
4 Panasonic EverVolt 380 W 21.7 % 92 %
5 Jinko Solar Tiger Pro 6Rl3 585 W 21.4 % 80.7 %
6 FuturaSun Silk Pro 440 W 21.16 % 87 %
7 Trina Solar Vertex S 405 W 21.1 % 83.1 %
8 Canadian Solar HiDM 420 W 20.4 % 83.1%
9 Solaria PowerXT 400 W 20.2 % 86%
10 Q Cells Peak Duo G6+ 345 W 19.5 % 85%
11 Mission Solar Energy 385 SX5R 385 W 19.3 % 84.08 %

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Solar Panel Pros and Cons – Are Solar Panels Worth the Cost?

If you are one of the many homeowners considering the installation of solar panels on your home’s rooftop, then undoubtedly one of the burning questions on your mind is whether the pros of solar energy outweigh the cons when it comes to solar panels for homes.

A new asphalt shingle roof with PV solar panels

Let’s examine the main benefits and drawbacks of residential solar energy systems to help you make a well-informed decision.

Advantages:

  1. Dramatic reduction in price per watt installed
  2. Short payback period
  3. Reduced reliance on power grid
  4. Electric energy price security
  5. Ample federal tax credits and local incentives
  6. Mandatory net metering rules
  7. Solar renewable energy certificates (SRECs)
  8. Clean renewable energy source
  9. Increased property values
  10. It’s easy to find a quality solar installer

Disadvantages:

  1. May not be suitable for some homes
  2. Won’t work during a blackout or power outage (unless…)
  3. Poor installation may lead to fire hazards
  4. Poor quality installation may lead to premature roof leaks
  5. The weight of solar panels can put excessive stress on the roof-frame
  6. Pollution and environmental hazards
  7. The “bulky” look of solar panels may turn off some people
  8. No energy production at night
  9. Solar battery storage is expensive
  10. Use of rare earth metals

Benefits and Advantages:

1. Dramatic reduction in the cost per installed watt

One of the strongest benefits of domestic solar power today is that the solar price per watt (PPV) installed has come down from almost $9.00 per watt installed in 2008, to the current average cost ranging from $2.80 to $3.50 per watt installed, before the 26% federal solar investment tax credits (ITC) that apply to the full amount paid for a new solar system.

Did you know? Homeowners going solar today are paying almost 66% less than they used to pay for solar energy just a little over a decade ago! That’s a very significant reduction in the upfront cost of investment, especially if you take into account the rate of inflation since 2008.

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