Category Archives: House Siding

Fiber Cement Siding Cost 2017-2018: HardiePlank Installation Cost per SF

In recent years, fiber cement siding has emerged as a viable and attractive alternative to the less-costly and more common vinyl siding.

Hardieplank fiber cement lap siding on a house

In this guide, we’ll explore the costs and pros and cons of fiber cement siding for residential retrofits in 2017-2018.

Cost

On average, you can expect to pay anywhere from $6.00 to $11.50 per square foot or $600 to $1,150 per square to install fiber cement siding on a typical house. The cost of professional installation will include all the necessary materials, labor, permitting, debris removal and disposal, and warranty. A square is equal to 100 square feet.

That being said, a typical fiber cement siding job (such as new HardiePlank or Allura lap siding) on average will cost between $12,500 to $25,000 to complete. The actual price for the job will vary with the size of the house, overall level of job difficulty, accessibility, and location. All things being equal, booming metro areas will be pricier than remote rural areas.

Note: On residential retrofits and exterior remodeling projects, a typical fiber cement siding installation will involve the removal and disposal of existing siding, thus adding an additional cost to the project.

Pro Tip: All fiber cement siding installations should include a weather-resistant barrier to allow the building to breathe and help prevent mold and mildew growth.

Example of a Typical Job Estimate

For instance, at an average cost of $800.00 per square (100 square feet), it will cost about $16,000 to install about 2,000 sq. ft. or 20 squares of fiber cement siding on a typical two-story house.

fiber-cement-siding-on-a-large-house

Did you know? Fiber cement siding installation costs are similar to wood siding and engineered wood composite siding, but are more expensive than vinyl.

Your home’s location and the company you choose to hire will have a major influence on the total cost of your project.

Material Costs

The price for fiber cement siding will vary depending on thickness of the panels – from 7/16 of an inch to one inch and the finish and styling chosen. Fiber cement siding such as HardiePlank® Lap Siding is sold in panels and traditional clapboards. Clapboards range from 4 inches to 12 inches wide. A standard length is 12 feet. The finish can be smooth, wood-grained or rough-sawn.

Fiber cement can also be shaped like siding shakes and shingles that are produced in strips or individual pieces. For instance, HardieShingle® siding is designed to replicate the look of cedar shingle siding often installed on Cape Cod-style homes, relaxed cottages, or ranch-style homes in a wooded setting.

Styles can include wood-grain and hand-split in 4-, 8- and 12-foot strips that are set in straight or staggered courses. Fiber cement in any configuration can be custom-fabricated for climate specificity.

Expect to pay from $150 per square (100 square feet) to $300 per square in material costs.

Installation Costs

Hardie Plank Fiber Cement Siding on a Cottage style home

Installation will cost between $300 and $850 per square (100 sq. ft.) depending on the complexity of the job, your location, and the company you choose to hire.

Fiber cement siding is heavy – about 2.5 pounds per square foot – and delicate. It is also flexible.

Did you Know? Carrying fiber cement siding around a job site is a two-man job so it will not crack and panels should always be transported vertically and not horizontally to again guard against cracking.

Toss in specialized tools and fasteners, unique cutting requirements and an expertise in not over-driving the fasteners into the studs, and the installation of fiber cement siding becomes a job best saved for professional installers.

ROI and Recouped Value

fiber-cement-siding-on-gambrel-house

In 2017, fiber cement siding installations resulted in an average of 80% to 85% in recouped value (cost-to-value return at a resale), making it one of the best-valued exterior remodeling upgrades of the year.

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Natural Stone Siding Cost Vs. Stucco and Brick Veneer Siding 2017-2018

House Siding Materials You Probably Never Heard of!

The primary purpose of any siding material is to add a layer of protection and insulation to your home thereby protecting it from the outer elements. Keeping that in mind, the other decisions that go into determining the best approach to a house siding project, whether you do it yourself or hire a professional, including curb appeal and the choice of the not-so-common materials can be put in proper perspective.

Stucco

stucco-siding Image source: View-Master Home Inspections

Some think of stucco as popular in certain regions like Southern California, without realizing there are likely stucco homes in their own neighborhood. It’s a great material that complements other house siding options.

Made from sand, cement, lime and water, the material is usually applied to a galvanized screen along with waterproof underlayment glued to a wood frame. The material isn’t all that versatile and instead is rather quite rigid, needing special care during installation to avoid cracks. But given that it is a hard material, it will last the life of a home, or at least 50+ years.

Cost: for stucco are around $6 to $12 per sq. ft. installed depending on the quality of materials, who’s doing the work and location of property.

An average-sized home will cost between $16,000 and $30,000 for traditional stucco siding, including installation.

Pros: Very durable, low maintenance, great insulator, colors go through mix so repainting not necessary, resistant to fire and insects

Cons: Fairly expensive, takes skill to install, prone to cracking, not very Eco-friendly, Offer poor performance in terms of insulation properties, tends to last less time in climates with lots of rain

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Vinyl Siding Cost vs. Fiber Cement & LP SmartSide 2017-2018

You have just spotted the first telltale signs of peeling paint from your house’s wood siding. It won’t be long now until the dreaded house painting becomes a must-do. Unless, 2017-2018 is the year you finally re-skin the house in vinyl siding.

Vinyl siding – actually polyvinyl chloride plastic resin that is heated and extruded into sheets – has only been around for about 50 years and was developed as a cheaper alternative to metal siding back in the 1950s. Its reputation for “cheap” was honestly earned as plasticized siding was susceptible to cracking and sagging. Colors were limited and those colors faded. Even well-cared for vinyl siding looked like… well… vinyl siding.

But in recent years, the two most important components of vinyl siding – the quality of materials and the expertise of installation — have made giant leaps forward.

Today about one-third of new American homes are built with maintenance-free (almost) vinyl installed as cladding.

Vinyl has been rated in various surveys to last anywhere from 60 to 100 years so this will likely be the last investment you make in your house’s siding.

What to Expect in Terms of Costs

So how much will it cost to cast those paint brushes aside and put new vinyl siding on your house?

vinyl siding on a cape style home Vinyl Siding on a Cape Cod style home installed by Siding & Windows Group

The short answer is anywhere from $3.50 to $7.50 per square foot installed, or around $350 to $750 per square (100 square feet) installed, on average. This can translate to a total cost of $7,000 to $15,000 for an average two-story house.

In a remodeling contractor survey done by Hanley Wood, the mid-range vinyl siding installation cost for a typical home (1,250 sq. ft. of siding installed) in the US was between $11,093 and $14,518 according to the Hanley Wood Remodeling Costs report for 2017. The survey reports an average cost-to-value return of about 76% for a new vinyl siding job.

That being said, your total cost for a new vinyl siding job will depend on a couple of factors; primarily the grade of materials (low-end, mid-range, or high-end), the quality of installation, and of course your home’s geographic location, accessibility, level of difficulty, etc. Let’s explore this further:

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