Top 6 Energy Efficient Home Improvements and Their Costs in 2021

Are your ready to make your home greener and more energy-efficient? If so, consider the following five home improvement upgrades that can be completed by a professional remodeling contractor, as well as by an experienced DIY enthusiast working collaboratively with a handy friend. 😉 1. Cool Roofs vs. Traditional Asphalt Shingles and Dark EPDM Rubber … Read more

Pella vs. Andersen Windows Cost 2021: Pros & Cons, ROI

Andersen and Pella, Pella, and Andersen. The two window giants are compared more often than any other two brands, and for a good reason; each company offers an impressive selection of windows ranging from affordable to luxurious, available in multiple materials and all window styles and sizes.

Pella Windows — Modern Farm House Bedroom

via Luxury Home Tours on Pella.com

This buying guide is your comprehensive source for window prices for both brands, plus their complete window series and styles information. We start with what’s on every homeowner’s mind:

  • How much do Pella windows cost?
  • How much do Andersen windows cost?

This table lists the window series, materials, and pricing details for all Pella and Andersen windows, making it easy to compare new window costs between these top two brands:

Pella Windows

Series Material Types Cost
Architect Series 850 Wood S, D, C, A $850-$1,550
Architect Series Reserve Wood D, C, A $1,000-$1,850
Lifestyle (previously Designer 750) Series Wood D, C, A $750-$1,250
450 Series/ProLine (discontinued) Wood D, C, A $450-$850
Impervia Fiberglass S, D, C, A, G $350-$800
350 Series Vinyl S, D, C, A, G $250-$475
250 Series Vinyl S, D, C, A, G $245-$395
Encompass by Pella Vinyl S, D, C, A, G $195-$345

Andersen Windows

Series Material Types Cost
Architectural Collection E-Series Wood D, C, A $1,150-$1,850
Architectural Collection A-Series Wood/Fibrex D, C, A $1,250-$1,950
400 Series Wood D, C, A, G $800-$1,250
200 Series Wood D, G $595-$950
100 Series Fibrex S, C, A, G $245-$595
Renewal by Andersen aka RBA Fibrex D, C, A, G $1,250-$1,950

Notes:

  • Cost: The Cost column reflects windows of average size and most common features chosen by homeowners. Specific window costs will range slightly lower or higher based on the feature package chosen such as window size, glazing/glass package, extras like exterior cladding, custom grilles, built-in blinds or shades.
  • Types Code: S=single-hung; D=double-hung; C=casement; A=awning; G=gliding or sliding. Most window series also offer picture/fixed windows and bay/bow window assemblies.

Did you know? New construction windows are different from replacement windows.

All Pella series and all Andersen series except for Renewal series can be used for new construction or as replacement windows. — If they are new construction windows, the frames are manufactured with a nailing fin used to secure the windows to the home’s exterior sheathing.

Replacement windows are secured to the window opening through the side jamb, so the exterior siding doesn’t need to be disrupted.

If you’re doing a complete exterior makeover including siding replacement, then either type can be used.

Installation Costs

Window installation costs below apply to both professional (warrantied) labor and any supplies required for all window types, double-hung, casement, fixed, etc.

  • New window (non-replacement) installation cost: $200-$300 per window
  • Basic Vinyl or Fiberglass Replacement window installation cost: $250-$400 per window
  • Wood-frame Replacement window installation cost: $350-$800 per window (more labor to replace wood windows)
  • Bay/Bow window installation cost: $400-$750 per window assembly

Window installations do cost less for new construction projects for two reasons:

  1. There are no old windows to remove first and windows quickly nail to the exterior sheathing on the home.
  2. Installing replacement windows in older homes can take significantly longer if the window openings have shifted or warped or if they need repair. — These delays will increase installation cost.

Cost-to-Value Return at Resale

National home remodeling and sales data show that window replacement return on investment (value recouped at resale) ranges from about 73% for upscale windows such as Pella Lifestyle (previously Designer 750) series and higher, Andersen 400 Series and higher, plus Renewal by Andersen, and up to 80% cost-to-value return for more affordable Pella and Andersen window lines.

For example, if you spend $10,000 on new windows, the potential sale price of your home in the first 10 years will be $7,300 to $8,000 higher.

The cost-to-value return speaks to the value recouped at the time of selling your home. It does not take into account the commutative value of energy savings and/or other benefits such as the enjoyment homeowners derived from the windows upgrade.

New windows can help a home sell faster, especially when the listing price is near the upper end of a potential buyer’s target price range. The buyer will have the assurance that replacing windows won’t be an expense they will need to worry about for the next 15-25 years.

Pro Tip: If you plan to sell your home in the next few years, replacing the windows isn’t a cost-effective choice unless they are in such poor condition, they’ll turn off buyers.

A better approach is to give potential buyers an allowance sufficient to cover the mid-grade new windows like Pella 350 high-end vinyl/Impervia Fiberglass or Andersen 200/400 Series. — This would cover their costs. The buyers could also use the money toward a premium window series, allowing the buyers to choose the kind of windows they like the best for the price.

Andersen Vs. Pella Window Comparison

Pella makes a broader overall range of window series in different materials compared to Andersen. You can view and buy Andersen windows at Home Depot, while Pella windows can be viewed and purchased at Lowe’s.

Andersen makes four solid wood series and one affordable Fibrex composite series. Pella makes three solid wood series, and one fiberglass Impervia Series windows that compare with the Andersen’s most affordable 100 Series windows made of Fibrex, though at a much higher cost for Pella Impervia. This comparison would be based on the window frame materials only (fiberglass vs. Fibrex) and not a fair series-to-series (Impervia is a mid-tier fiberglass window series line from Pella) comparison.

Andersen 100-Series Windows

Did you know? The primary difference between Pella and Andersen is that Pella also makes three vinyl window lines, and one fiberglass-frame window. Pella Impervia, the fiberglass window series sits right in between the wood and vinyl product lines based on Pella’s pricing tiers.

Andersen, on the other hand, offers windows made from their proprietary composite material called Fibrex, which is made from 40% reclaimed wood fibers by weight (from the production of Andersen wood windows) combined with 60% thermoplastic polymer (PVC vinyl) by weight.

Note: Andersen also has a completely separate line of high-end Fibrex windows called Renewals by Andersen, which is a whole separate business unit/division within Andersen. RBA windows are made for replacement only and are sold through the in-home sales presentations by independent RBA dealers. We cover the Renewals by Andersen offering, right below the main lineup of Andersen windows.

Pella Architect Series / 850 Series

Pella Architect Series

Pella Architect series windows are made in two sub-lines. The Architect Series Traditional windows are beefier with very classic styling. The Architect Series Contemporary windows are sleeker, lither with very clean sight lines. Here’s what they offer:

  • Materials: Pine, Douglas fir, mahogany, white oak, red oak, cherry, and maple (Traditional); Pine, Douglas fir and mahogany (Contemporary)
  • Interior colors: 4 paint and 9 stain options.
  • Exterior colors: 27 colors of aluminum cladding.
  • Hardware: 5 Traditional and 9 Contemporary finishes in several styles.
  • Sizes: Standard and Custom
  • Window types: Single-hung, double-hung, casement and awning (Traditional); Casement and awning (Contemporary).
  • Glass: 4 glass package options.
  • Accessories: 4 grille styles and 2 screen types. Insynctive window sensors integrate with smart home security systems.
  • Warranty: Lifetime Limited.

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Window Replacement Cost in 2021: Vinyl vs. Wood vs. Fiberglass Windows

Everyone knows windows are expensive, but just how big a bite do they take out of the budget?

Cost

The average cost to replace a typical 36-by-60 double-hung vinyl window can range from $600 to $1,000 per window. This gives you an average cost of about $800 per double-hung, double-pane, Low-E glass vinyl window replaced.

A typical project to replace 10 mid-range double-pane windows with Low-E glass could cost around $8,000-$10,000 when performed by a reputable local installer.

A window’s brand and quality, window features, overall size and difficulty of the job, choice of installer and warranty provided, and the local cost of living/property values will affect the bottom line.

Pella 250 vinyl double-hung windows

Note: The cost of each window can vary significantly based on many factors, such as the window size, frame material (vinyl, wood, fiberglass), glass type (double Low-E vs. tipple Low-E/double-pane vs. triple-pane), finish options, etc.

For these living in or near expensive coastal cities like Washington DC, Portland, Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, Miami, Boston, New York City, etc., the quoted costs you are likely to encounter will be significantly higher compared to Southern and Midwestern states, and rural areas.

Smaller, fixed windows used as accents, or the ones installed in some bathrooms will be significantly less expensive.

Oversized, functional windows offering dramatic views will command a higher price, although large, premium windows aren’t normally found in most residential homes.


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