Roof Repair Cost: Minor and Major Repairs in 2022

To repair a roof or not, that is the question. Actually, the question is based on whether the cost of the repair is worth doing it now or waiting a while. In which case, it is more like a gamble. And a wager that each homeowner makes virtually every day. Yet, when an obvious problem comes up, such as water trickling overhead, into your living space, the decision is easy: fix the leak! 😉

missing-shingles

Our goal with this guide is to make sure you are better equipped for managing what really is an ongoing wager between your roof and the elements outside, along with the factor of time. Both the father time and weather elements like sun, strong winds, freeze-and-thaw cycles are essentially sabotaging all the good will, value, and hence the lifespan of your roof.

Do nothing between now and the next time your roof needs to be replaced, and the odds are against you. Sure, you might get lucky, but you also have an ample opportunity to make your own luck by taking proactive roof maintenance and repair measures early. — To be smart with the wager. — To keep the little problems as little and manage bigger problems with effectiveness.

We have lots of ground to cover, but let’s begin with the primary reason for this guide, the expected cost range for a typical roof repair:

  • $150 to $400 for minor repairs
  • $400 to $1,200 for moderate repairs
  • $1,200 to $3,500 for major repairs

Did you know? Most homeowners spend between $300 and $1,200 for a roof repair, or an average of $650-$850 to fix a roof related issue.

Going beyond $3,500 is possible, but at that point a replacement roof could be your best bet. The average cost to install a new roof for a moderate sized home is $9,500+. While this is the worst-case scenario, in terms of cost, it does allow you to start anew. Still, our goal is to keep costs reasonable, while increasing value.

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How to Install Metal Wall Panels – Metal Cladding for Homes

Looking around at the different houses on the street and not finding a unique, modern look that satisfies your desire for articulated lines yet is minimalist enough to not be in everyone’s eyes? Perhaps you are looking for Aluminum or Steel Standing Seam Siding. In this article, we will show how such a system is installed, as well as explain its properties and a bit of history.

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As you may know, aluminum siding has been very popular about 60 years ago; however, with changing tides in the global commodity market and innovative use of cheaper PVC (vinyl) siding, the use of aluminum and steel as a siding material has declined. Nevertheless, it has reemerged as an element of modern and contemporary design.

Modern metal wall panels such as corrugated metal, standing seam, and metal shingle cladding, provide a unique alternative to the standard options — when desiring something more than the same old vinyl siding or cedar shingles look for the exterior walls of your house. Read to learn more about how to go about installing metal wall panels and what to expect.

Standing Seam Siding — Project Details:

Length between the seams – should be adjusted so that most penetrations would fall between the seams.
Height of the seam – purely aesthetic but should be at least 1” tall.
Wall anchoring – two options nail strip or clips (longer use clips short use nail strip).
Lock type – snap lock or lock in from side, contractor preference.

Paint Finish – KYNAR 500® PVDF or HYLAR 5000® PVDF high quality raisin paint.

Gage – Thickness standard for aluminum siding and roofing is 0.032 to 0.040.

Project: Siding on the back portion of a town house with adjacent units on both sides.

Location: Boston, MA

Substrate: wood siding on top of boards.

Color: Silversmith and mate black window trim.

Type of panel: Nail-strip snap-lock.

Initial Inspection and material order preparation

First thing one should do when installing metal siding is to see if the deck, in our case wood planks, would hold the screws. Make sure that there is no rot or cracked boards (we were lucky as some of the siding was already removed).

Second measure every distance from sides to protruding objects such as windows, pipes, and outlets – try to record how big a penetration would be – to properly select the width of the panels. This step is crucial to having a clean look, flashing around objects is hard enough flashing with a seam in the middle is twice as hard.

Once all the above is done, I used Sketchup by Google, draw a diagram, and come up with a width that will make the least number of cuts necessary to go around windows and penetrations. After the diagram is adjusted for accuracy, the order is sent to the manufacturer.

removing old siding

Removing old siding, fixing deck, and installing underlayment

The main problem here is not to damage the adjacent buildings and the newly installed door. As this was wood siding and the work area was very small, we used crow bars which both less destructive and tests the strength of the boards underneath. As expected, some of the boards were rotten and on top of that the blown in insulation fell out once we removed the rotten boards.

After a quick run to Home Depot, we got some 3/4” plywood and pink insulation, and fixed the troubled areas. When installing standing seam for either roofing or siding applications, the deck should be as straight as possible and should not have any nails sticking out — if they are, sooner or later the aluminum will take the form of anything that’s underneath it.

New Shingle Roof

$7,500
Average price
New Metal Roof

$14,500
Average price
New Flat Roof

$8,225
Average price

See costs in your area Enter Your Zip Code

As with traditional siding choice the wood deck should be covered in underlayment/vapor barrier. Our choice is the synthetic breathable underlayment by GAF called Deck Armor. — It allows moisture to escape but doesn’t allow any water from the outside to penetrate.

Thus, it can help remove (vent out) any excess moisture coming from inside the house, while preserving the wood, insulation, and walls for many years to come. Underlay also acts as a second water barrier. — This treatment makes the side walls watertight.

Underlayment should be installed starting from the bottom, all the way to the top. It can be left exposed for months if the project were to be delayed or interrupted for whatever reason.

Flashing around windows and sides

flashing-windows-walls


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Standing Seam Metal Roofing Installation – DIY Step by Step Guide!

Installing a standing seam metal roof is not as easy as it may seem at first. “Yeah”, you might think: “What is there to do? Just put up those panels!”.

standing-seam-panel-installation-finishing-touches

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Not so quick, now! Standing seam installation process can actually involve a lot of tedious work, so let’s cover it in a step-by-step fashion to see some of the challenges it may entail. Shall we?

| 1. Basic Prep Work Required |
| 2. Necessary Tools, Materials, and Supplies |
| 3. Installation Process |

1. Basic Preparation for the Job

The most important thing about installing standing seam, is to measure the roof correctly and precisely. Here is why; Each standing seam panel is cut to the exact size, and if your panels are too short, you will run the following costly issues:

A) If a panel is only 2″ short, you may not be able to use your ridge cap as it will not cover the ends of the panels. In this case you will have to get or make a wider cap. In this case it will go from 12 to 16″ wide cap (remember – panels are 2” off on each side, so we add 4″ to the ridge cap)

B) If panels are short by 4-6″ you may not be able to get a cap that wide, so now you have only two options: Ether panels are useless, or you splice them. Splicing 6-inch metal panels, while sitting at the ridge of your roof is about as much fun as head-butting the curb! 😉 You would probably want to get at least 2-3 feet long panels for splicing. You will also need at least a foot of overlap on each panel.

In either case you will run into additional work and will likely have to spend a lot more money compared to what should have (and could have) been originally spent.

New Shingle Roof

$7,500
Average price
New Metal Roof

$14,500
Average price
New Flat Roof

$8,225
Average price

See costs in your area Enter Your Zip Code

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