Pella vs. Andersen Windows Cost 2021: Pros & Cons, ROI

Andersen and Pella, Pella, and Andersen. The two window giants are compared more often than any other two brands, and for a good reason; each company offers an impressive selection of windows ranging from affordable to luxurious, available in multiple materials and all window styles and sizes.

Pella Windows — Modern Farm House Bedroom

via Luxury Home Tours on Pella.com

This buying guide is your comprehensive source for window prices for both brands, plus their complete window series and styles information. We start with what’s on every homeowner’s mind:

  • How much do Pella windows cost?
  • How much do Andersen windows cost?

This table lists the window series, materials, and pricing details for all Pella and Andersen windows, making it easy to compare new window costs between these top two brands:

Pella Windows

Series Material Types Cost
Architect Series 850 Wood S, D, C, A $850-$1,550
Architect Series Reserve Wood D, C, A $1,000-$1,850
Lifestyle (previously Designer 750) Series Wood D, C, A $750-$1,250
450 Series/ProLine (discontinued) Wood D, C, A $450-$850
Impervia Fiberglass S, D, C, A, G $350-$800
350 Series Vinyl S, D, C, A, G $250-$475
250 Series Vinyl S, D, C, A, G $245-$395
Encompass by Pella Vinyl S, D, C, A, G $195-$345

Andersen Windows

Series Material Types Cost
Architectural Collection E-Series Wood D, C, A $1,150-$1,850
Architectural Collection A-Series Wood/Fibrex D, C, A $1,250-$1,950
400 Series Wood D, C, A, G $800-$1,250
200 Series Wood D, G $595-$950
100 Series Fibrex S, C, A, G $245-$595
Renewal by Andersen aka RBA Fibrex D, C, A, G $1,250-$1,950

Notes:

  • Cost: The Cost column reflects windows of average size and most common features chosen by homeowners. Specific window costs will range slightly lower or higher based on the feature package chosen such as window size, glazing/glass package, extras like exterior cladding, custom grilles, built-in blinds or shades.
  • Types Code: S=single-hung; D=double-hung; C=casement; A=awning; G=gliding or sliding. Most window series also offer picture/fixed windows and bay/bow window assemblies.

Did you know? New construction windows are different from replacement windows.

All Pella series and all Andersen series except for Renewal series can be used for new construction or as replacement windows. — If they are new construction windows, the frames are manufactured with a nailing fin used to secure the windows to the home’s exterior sheathing.

Replacement windows are secured to the window opening through the side jamb, so the exterior siding doesn’t need to be disrupted.

If you’re doing a complete exterior makeover including siding replacement, then either type can be used.

Installation Costs

Window installation costs below apply to both professional (warrantied) labor and any supplies required for all window types, double-hung, casement, fixed, etc.

  • New window (non-replacement) installation cost: $200-$300 per window
  • Basic Vinyl or Fiberglass Replacement window installation cost: $250-$400 per window
  • Wood-frame Replacement window installation cost: $350-$800 per window (more labor to replace wood windows)
  • Bay/Bow window installation cost: $400-$750 per window assembly

Window installations do cost less for new construction projects for two reasons:

  1. There are no old windows to remove first and windows quickly nail to the exterior sheathing on the home.
  2. Installing replacement windows in older homes can take significantly longer if the window openings have shifted or warped or if they need repair. — These delays will increase installation cost.

Cost-to-Value Return at Resale

National home remodeling and sales data show that window replacement return on investment (value recouped at resale) ranges from about 73% for upscale windows such as Pella Lifestyle (previously Designer 750) series and higher, Andersen 400 Series and higher, plus Renewal by Andersen, and up to 80% cost-to-value return for more affordable Pella and Andersen window lines.

For example, if you spend $10,000 on new windows, the potential sale price of your home in the first 10 years will be $7,300 to $8,000 higher.

The cost-to-value return speaks to the value recouped at the time of selling your home. It does not take into account the commutative value of energy savings and/or other benefits such as the enjoyment homeowners derived from the windows upgrade.

New windows can help a home sell faster, especially when the listing price is near the upper end of a potential buyer’s target price range. The buyer will have the assurance that replacing windows won’t be an expense they will need to worry about for the next 15-25 years.

Pro Tip: If you plan to sell your home in the next few years, replacing the windows isn’t a cost-effective choice unless they are in such poor condition, they’ll turn off buyers.

A better approach is to give potential buyers an allowance sufficient to cover the mid-grade new windows like Pella 350 high-end vinyl/Impervia Fiberglass or Andersen 200/400 Series. — This would cover their costs. The buyers could also use the money toward a premium window series, allowing the buyers to choose the kind of windows they like the best for the price.

Andersen Vs. Pella Window Comparison

Pella makes a broader overall range of window series in different materials compared to Andersen. You can view and buy Andersen windows at Home Depot, while Pella windows can be viewed and purchased at Lowe’s.

Andersen makes four solid wood series and one affordable Fibrex composite series. Pella makes three solid wood series, and one fiberglass Impervia Series windows that compare with the Andersen’s most affordable 100 Series windows made of Fibrex, though at a much higher cost for Pella Impervia. This comparison would be based on the window frame materials only (fiberglass vs. Fibrex) and not a fair series-to-series (Impervia is a mid-tier fiberglass window series line from Pella) comparison.

Andersen 100-Series Windows

Did you know? The primary difference between Pella and Andersen is that Pella also makes three vinyl window lines, and one fiberglass-frame window. Pella Impervia, the fiberglass window series sits right in between the wood and vinyl product lines based on Pella’s pricing tiers.

Andersen, on the other hand, offers windows made from their proprietary composite material called Fibrex, which is made from 40% reclaimed wood fibers by weight (from the production of Andersen wood windows) combined with 60% thermoplastic polymer (PVC vinyl) by weight.

Note: Andersen also has a completely separate line of high-end Fibrex windows called Renewals by Andersen, which is a whole separate business unit/division within Andersen. RBA windows are made for replacement only and are sold through the in-home sales presentations by independent RBA dealers. We cover the Renewals by Andersen offering, right below the main lineup of Andersen windows.

Pella Architect Series / 850 Series

Pella Architect Series

Pella Architect series windows are made in two sub-lines. The Architect Series Traditional windows are beefier with very classic styling. The Architect Series Contemporary windows are sleeker, lither with very clean sight lines. Here’s what they offer:

  • Materials: Pine, Douglas fir, mahogany, white oak, red oak, cherry, and maple (Traditional); Pine, Douglas fir and mahogany (Contemporary)
  • Interior colors: 4 paint and 9 stain options.
  • Exterior colors: 27 colors of aluminum cladding.
  • Hardware: 5 Traditional and 9 Contemporary finishes in several styles.
  • Sizes: Standard and Custom
  • Window types: Single-hung, double-hung, casement and awning (Traditional); Casement and awning (Contemporary).
  • Glass: 4 glass package options.
  • Accessories: 4 grille styles and 2 screen types. Insynctive window sensors integrate with smart home security systems.
  • Warranty: Lifetime Limited.

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Pros & Cons of GAF Shingles – Costs – Unbiased GAF Roofing Reviews

GAF is at or near the top of the best-selling asphalt shingles list. Is GAF’s enviable market share the result of consistent quality and performance, or is it driven by a large marketing budget that helps cover its flaws? Let’s explore.

GAF Woodland Shingles Roof
via GAF

There are obvious things to like about GAF – the wide selection of asphalt shingle styles and colors are sold nationally, and if you need more of the same shingles five or ten years later, they will likely be available.

On the downside, it is well documented that GAF, like most other shingle manufacturers, sometimes denies warranty claims that seem legitimate. The company settled a major class action lawsuit over warranty claims on defective shingles manufactured from 1998 to 2009, primarily at one plant. Let’s dig deeper.

Are GAF Shingles the Right Choice for Your Home?

This investigative look at GAF shingles is for homeowners who are considering GAF products and want to do their due diligence before making the roofing material decision.

This gives you the perspective of contractors that have installed GAF shingles for decades, home inspectors that have inspected hundreds of GAF-covered homes, and homeowners that live with GAF shingles on their roof every day.

Pros

Let’s look at the GAF shingle pros from the three perspectives mentioned: Installers, inspectors and homeowners.

Why roofing contractors like GAF shingles: There are a couple reasons that most roofers are happy to install GAF products, and some swear by them.

  • The GAF complete roofing system: When you purchase mechanical systems, an HVAC system for example, it’s important that the components such as the condensing unit, indoor coil, gas furnace and the thermostat control are designed to work together. The result is optimized performance.
Components of GAF asphalt roofing system
GAF – The Lifetime Roofing System

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Atlas vs. IKO Roofing Shingles: Cost, ROI – Definitive Guide for Homeowners

While the “battle” for contractors’ and homeowners’ attention and residential roofing marketshare between Atlas and IKO shingles doesn’t have the same heavyweight interest of GAF vs. Owens Corning, these brands are certainly not fighting over scraps.

Atlas Castlebrook architectural shingles roof. Source: Atlas Roofing

Both IKO and Atlas enjoy a moderate share of the composition shingles market, and the popularity of their steep-slope roofing products is growing every year. Currently, each brand offers 8 main shingle lines in the basic, better, and premium tiers explained in this guide.

Atlas and IKO Head-to-Head Comparison

IKO Cambridge and Atlas Pinnacle Pristine are the best sellers between the two manufacturers.

IKO asphalt shingles roof. Source IKO

However, there are plenty of other solid and compelling shingle options to consider outside of the mid-range lines, including the affordable 3-tab shingles, several high-end architectural series, and premium shingles from both brands.

Pro Tip: Talk to several contractors before you make a hiring decision. Many experienced roofing contractors install a wide range of shingles including both IKO and Atlas shingles. That’s one reason we recommend getting estimates from several different installers, so you can get expert advice and recommendations on which brand of shingles are best suited for the specific climate conditions in your area.

Did you know? IKO has a special Performance shingles category which includes IKO Dynasty and IKO Nordic shingles reinforced with ArmourZone for hail impact resistance (IR shingles) and exceptional high-wind and weather performance.

Meanwhile, Atlas also offers the enhanced-construction and impact-resistant (IR) shingles. We cover IR products from both brands in the Hail impact-resistant shingles section of the guide.

What you’ll find in this guide:

You’re here for sound advice, not a bunch of nonobjective marketing talk, and that is what we deliver.

We pick winners and losers in each category of roofing shingles. Let’s explore.

  1. Quality – Which brand makes better shingles in each tier?
  2. Costs – We list the current retail prices from major sellers – and where you can and cannot find roofing shingles from these brands.
  3. Performance and Value – IKO’s two most expensive shingle lines cost more, but are they worth the higher price? You’ll have a good idea of what you get for the money.
  4. Hail Impact Resistant Shingles – What they are, and what is and isn’t covered under the manufacturer’s warranties – Plus the best shingles from each brand for defending your roof from this weather menace
  5. Energy Efficient Shingles AKA Cool Roof Shingles from both brands.
  6. CA Title 24, LA County Green Building Code Roofing Shingles – Do any Atlas or IKO shingles meet these stringent standards?
  7. Warranty Comparison – and should you buy based on warranty? Are extended warranties worth the extra money? Do IKO and Atlas offer hail impact damage warranties?
  8. Bottom-line and Takeaways: While these are discussed throughout, we wrap up with final thoughts and conclusion to help you make the best choice.

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