Metal Roofing Buying Guide 2022: Facts, Myths, Prices, FAQ – Metal Roofs

If you are looking to replace that old asphalt roof on your home with a metal roof this Spring, Summer or Fall, but still have a few lingering questions or concerns, then here are the top 70 metal roofing facts, myth-busters, FAQ, plus an overview of costs and pros and cons to consider before making your buying decision.

A Rustic House with a Multi-Level Standing Seam Metal Roof Designed to Shed Ice and Snow Build-up

via Birdseye Design

Did you know? A metal roof can be a sensible way to protect your home, especially if you happen to live in an area that experiences a lot of storms, rapid temperature changes, beaming sun that melts asphalt, large hail, or heavy snowfall. — Just ask any homeowner in Florida, Oklahoma, Arizona, Texas, Illinois, Ohio, upstate New York, Northern New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, and they will readily attest to this! 😉

New Shingle Roof

$7,500
Average price
New Metal Roof

$14,500
Average price
New Flat Roof

$8,225
Average price

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To help you navigate this long list, we broke it down into the following categories:

Materials Pros & Cons Standing Seam Metal Roof Galvalume Color

Cost of Materials
Installation
Cost of Installation
Colors & Styles
Longevity
Weather Protection
Durability
Maintenance
Energy Efficiency
Environmental Impact
ROI
10 Bonus Facts

Metal Roofing Materials Pros & Cons:

  • standing-seam Metal roofs can be made from a variety of metals and alloys including
    — Galvanized G-90 steel (hot-dip zinc galvanized high-end steel), and G-60 steel (a less expensive, thinner-gauge steel, often used in low-end, lower-cost corrugated and ribbed metal panels)
    Galvalume steel (zinc and aluminum coated steel) has a more expensive and longer-lasting coating compared to G-90 galvanized steel.
    — stone-coated steel (G-90 galvanized steel), aluminum, copper, zinc, terne (zinc-tin alloy), and stainless steel.

  • The downside of galvanized steel (G-90, and especially G-60) is that it can corrode, eventually, especially when exposed to moist, salt-spray environment such as when your home is situated near the ocean or near the coastal areas.

  • Steel is the most frequently used material in both residential and commercial applications, mainly due to its lower cost.

  • Aluminum is the second most popular material. It is more durable and longer lasting than steel, but only costs a fraction of the price of premium metals, such as copper or zinc.

  • Aluminum is also one of the best metals to use for roofs located in coastal areas (think those beach homes), where there is a heavy presence of salt spray in the environment.

  • Copper roofs are the most durable and can last for hundreds of years. However, due to prohibitively high cost, few people choose to install an entire roof made from copper. Instead, home and business-owners choose copper for architectural details/accents on the roof (bay windows, towers, porches, low slope roof sections, Etc.).

copper standing seam bay windows

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Going Off-Grid with a Solar Panel System: What You Need to Know

There are many ways to use solar panels, and the best option will depend on your energy consumption habits and electricity tariffs. You can have a grid-tied installation that only reduces your power bills when the sun is shining, or you can install a solar battery system that can be used after sunset. It’s also possible to design an off-grid solar power system that is fully independent from external energy sources besides the sun.

via Paradise Solar Energy

However, keep in mind that the design and installation process changes depending on the type of solar system you’re looking for. To make sure you get the best possible results, your requirements and expectations should be explained clearly to solar installers before asking for quotes.

As you might expect, the price of solar power systems changes depending on their complexity and features. A basic grid-tied system with a 10-kilowatt capacity is much more affordable than a 10-kilowatt system with a home battery and smart energy monitoring, even when the solar panel capacity is equal in both cases.

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Pella vs. Andersen Windows Cost 2021: Pros & Cons, ROI

Andersen and Pella, Pella, and Andersen. The two window giants are compared more often than any other two brands, and for a good reason; each company offers an impressive selection of windows ranging from affordable to luxurious, available in multiple materials and all window styles and sizes.

Pella Windows — Modern Farm House Bedroom

via Luxury Home Tours on Pella.com

This buying guide is your comprehensive source for window prices for both brands, plus their complete window series and styles information. We start with what’s on every homeowner’s mind:

  • How much do Pella windows cost?
  • How much do Andersen windows cost?

This table lists the window series, materials, and pricing details for all Pella and Andersen windows, making it easy to compare new window costs between these top two brands:

Pella Windows

Series Material Types Cost
Architect Series 850 Wood S, D, C, A $850-$1,550
Architect Series Reserve Wood D, C, A $1,000-$1,850
Lifestyle (previously Designer 750) Series Wood D, C, A $750-$1,250
450 Series/ProLine (discontinued) Wood D, C, A $450-$850
Impervia Fiberglass S, D, C, A, G $350-$800
350 Series Vinyl S, D, C, A, G $250-$475
250 Series Vinyl S, D, C, A, G $245-$395
Encompass by Pella Vinyl S, D, C, A, G $195-$345

Andersen Windows

Series Material Types Cost
Architectural Collection E-Series Wood D, C, A $1,150-$1,850
Architectural Collection A-Series Wood/Fibrex D, C, A $1,250-$1,950
400 Series Wood D, C, A, G $800-$1,250
200 Series Wood D, G $595-$950
100 Series Fibrex S, C, A, G $245-$595
Renewal by Andersen aka RBA Fibrex D, C, A, G $1,250-$1,950

Notes:

  • Cost: The Cost column reflects windows of average size and most common features chosen by homeowners. Specific window costs will range slightly lower or higher based on the feature package chosen such as window size, glazing/glass package, extras like exterior cladding, custom grilles, built-in blinds or shades.
  • Types Code: S=single-hung; D=double-hung; C=casement; A=awning; G=gliding or sliding. Most window series also offer picture/fixed windows and bay/bow window assemblies.

Did you know? New construction windows are different from replacement windows.

All Pella series and all Andersen series except for Renewal series can be used for new construction or as replacement windows. — If they are new construction windows, the frames are manufactured with a nailing fin used to secure the windows to the home’s exterior sheathing.

Replacement windows are secured to the window opening through the side jamb, so the exterior siding doesn’t need to be disrupted.

If you’re doing a complete exterior makeover including siding replacement, then either type can be used.

Installation Costs

Window installation costs below apply to both professional (warrantied) labor and any supplies required for all window types, double-hung, casement, fixed, etc.

  • New window (non-replacement) installation cost: $200-$300 per window
  • Basic Vinyl or Fiberglass Replacement window installation cost: $250-$400 per window
  • Wood-frame Replacement window installation cost: $350-$800 per window (more labor to replace wood windows)
  • Bay/Bow window installation cost: $400-$750 per window assembly

Window installations do cost less for new construction projects for two reasons:

  1. There are no old windows to remove first and windows quickly nail to the exterior sheathing on the home.
  2. Installing replacement windows in older homes can take significantly longer if the window openings have shifted or warped or if they need repair. — These delays will increase installation cost.

Cost-to-Value Return at Resale

National home remodeling and sales data show that window replacement return on investment (value recouped at resale) ranges from about 73% for upscale windows such as Pella Lifestyle (previously Designer 750) series and higher, Andersen 400 Series and higher, plus Renewal by Andersen, and up to 80% cost-to-value return for more affordable Pella and Andersen window lines.

For example, if you spend $10,000 on new windows, the potential sale price of your home in the first 10 years will be $7,300 to $8,000 higher.

The cost-to-value return speaks to the value recouped at the time of selling your home. It does not take into account the commutative value of energy savings and/or other benefits such as the enjoyment homeowners derived from the windows upgrade.

New windows can help a home sell faster, especially when the listing price is near the upper end of a potential buyer’s target price range. The buyer will have the assurance that replacing windows won’t be an expense they will need to worry about for the next 15-25 years.

Pro Tip: If you plan to sell your home in the next few years, replacing the windows isn’t a cost-effective choice unless they are in such poor condition, they’ll turn off buyers.

A better approach is to give potential buyers an allowance sufficient to cover the mid-grade new windows like Pella 350 high-end vinyl/Impervia Fiberglass or Andersen 200/400 Series. — This would cover their costs. The buyers could also use the money toward a premium window series, allowing the buyers to choose the kind of windows they like the best for the price.

Andersen Vs. Pella Window Comparison

Pella makes a broader overall range of window series in different materials compared to Andersen. You can view and buy Andersen windows at Home Depot, while Pella windows can be viewed and purchased at Lowe’s.

Andersen makes four solid wood series and one affordable Fibrex composite series. Pella makes three solid wood series, and one fiberglass Impervia Series windows that compare with the Andersen’s most affordable 100 Series windows made of Fibrex, though at a much higher cost for Pella Impervia. This comparison would be based on the window frame materials only (fiberglass vs. Fibrex) and not a fair series-to-series (Impervia is a mid-tier fiberglass window series line from Pella) comparison.

Andersen 100-Series Windows

Did you know? The primary difference between Pella and Andersen is that Pella also makes three vinyl window lines, and one fiberglass-frame window. Pella Impervia, the fiberglass window series sits right in between the wood and vinyl product lines based on Pella’s pricing tiers.

Andersen, on the other hand, offers windows made from their proprietary composite material called Fibrex, which is made from 40% reclaimed wood fibers by weight (from the production of Andersen wood windows) combined with 60% thermoplastic polymer (PVC vinyl) by weight.

Note: Andersen also has a completely separate line of high-end Fibrex windows called Renewals by Andersen, which is a whole separate business unit/division within Andersen. RBA windows are made for replacement only and are sold through the in-home sales presentations by independent RBA dealers. We cover the Renewals by Andersen offering, right below the main lineup of Andersen windows.

Pella Architect Series / 850 Series

Pella Architect Series

Pella Architect series windows are made in two sub-lines. The Architect Series Traditional windows are beefier with very classic styling. The Architect Series Contemporary windows are sleeker, lither with very clean sight lines. Here’s what they offer:

  • Materials: Pine, Douglas fir, mahogany, white oak, red oak, cherry, and maple (Traditional); Pine, Douglas fir and mahogany (Contemporary)
  • Interior colors: 4 paint and 9 stain options.
  • Exterior colors: 27 colors of aluminum cladding.
  • Hardware: 5 Traditional and 9 Contemporary finishes in several styles.
  • Sizes: Standard and Custom
  • Window types: Single-hung, double-hung, casement and awning (Traditional); Casement and awning (Contemporary).
  • Glass: 4 glass package options.
  • Accessories: 4 grille styles and 2 screen types. Insynctive window sensors integrate with smart home security systems.
  • Warranty: Lifetime Limited.

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