Category Archives: Metal Roofing

Metal Roofing Buying Guide – FAQs – Facts – Pros & Cons

If you are considering a new metal roof as potential replacement option for your aging asphalt roof, or you simply want to learn more about this sturdy and energy efficient roofing option, then check out list of the top 70 metal roofing facts below:

In order to help you navigate this long list, we broke it down into the following categories:

Materials Pros & Cons a-rugged-standing-seam-metal-roof
Cost of Materials
Installation
Cost of Installation
Colors & Styles
Longevity
Weather Protection
Durability
Maintenance
Energy Efficiency
Environmental Impact
ROI
10 Bonus Facts

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Materials Pros & Cons:

Standing Seam Metal Roof Galvalume Color 1. Metal roofs can be made from a variety of metals and alloys including Galvanized steel (hot zinc dipped G-90 steel, or G-60 steel coated with thinner, least-expensive coating), Galvalume steel (Zinc and Aluminum coating — more expensive and longer lasting compared to G-90 steel.), stone-coated steel (G-90 galvanized steel), aluminum, copper, zinc, terne (zinc-tin alloy), and stainless steel.


  1. The downside of galvanized steel is that it can corrode, eventually, especially when exposed to the moist salt-spray environment, such as near the coastal lines and salty marine environments.

It must be noted that all things being equal, Galvalume steel offers a greater degree of corrosion-resistance and hence longevity than G-90 galvanized steel. G-60 steel is joke compared to Galvalume steel and its cost reflects that. 😉

  1. Steel is the most frequently used material in both residential and commercial metal roof and wall applications, mainly due to its superior durability, strength, and slightly lower cost than aluminum.
  2. Aluminum is the second most popular metal in roofing after steel. It is not affected by the moist salt spray environments like coated steel. Aluminum is only slightly more expensive than steel, but it’s far less expensive than premium metals such as copper, zinc, titanium, and stainless steel.

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2020 Standing Seam Metal Roof Details: Cost, Colors, and Pros & Cons

Standing seam is a descriptive industry term for vertical sheet metal panels. It’s one of the most popular metal roofing styles for homes, thanks to its beauty, durability, longevity, simplicity, versatility, energy efficiency, and its remarkably clean, bold looks.

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If you like the modern style of raised metal seams and clean lines, then consider installing this system on your home. A standing seam metal roof will not only compliment your home, but it will also give it that contemporary look and feel, along with its unmatched durability, longevity, and energy efficiency. 😉

Standing Seam Metal Panels in a Nutshell

Standing seam is a high-end upgrade and an undisputed step up in quality and longevity from the classic corrugated and ribbed style metal roofs. Unlike its predecessor, corrugated steel roofing, which is still being widely used today for many commercial, industrial, and even some residential projects, standing seam has an improved design featuring concealed fasteners.

The ingenious design of standing seam metal roof featuring its characteristic raised seams, with no exposed screws in the roof, helps minimize the chance of a roof leak down the road.

Standing seam roof on a two story house

Install Roof Shingles

$7,500
Average price
Install Metal Roof

$14,500
Average price
Install Flat Roof

$8,225
Average price

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Standing Seam vs. Corrugated Metal

Standing seam roofs are generally made from thicker grades of steel than corrugated steel roofs. While many corrugated steel roofs are made using the thinner 29 gauge steel, a minimum of 26 gauge G-90 galvanized steel or more commonly Galvalume steel (better) is used for manufacturing of standing seam metal panels.

A 24 and 22 gauge steel can also be used for residential and commercial styles including architectural (requiring a roof deck) and structural (requiring a suitable roof frame only) profiles.

A mid-panel stiffening technique is sometimes employed by the sheet metal fabricators, suppliers and manufacturers for a 16 inch and wider standing seam panels in order to prevent “oil canning” of the panels.

A metal coil from which standing seam panels are manufactured is usually factory painted with a high-end Kynar 500 paint finish. — this is unlike its close cousins corrugated and ribbed metal roofs (featuring exposed fasteners) that are often painted with cheaper, acrylic paints.


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The Ultimate Guide to Getting a New Roof in 2020 – Homeowner’s Guide

A new roof is a costly investment with practical and aesthetic implications – the roof is your home’s most important protection against rain, snow and natures elements. The roof can also significantly impact the appeal of your home in the eyes of potential buyers.

GAF Timberline HD Shingles Roof

This guide will help you make an informed decision when it comes to re-roofing (adding a new layer of roofing to the existing roof) or removing and replacing the old roof.

Seven Signs You Need a New Roof

Here are the indicators that your roof should be re-shingled or replaced to maintain your home’s defense against the elements:

  • Shingles are visibly worn: Are there so many of the colored granules gone that your roof looks like it has bald spots? While the shingles might still be keeping moisture out, a lack of reflective granules allows excess heat into your home, raising the temperature inside your house and increasing your air conditioning costs. Furthermore, once exposed, the underlying asphalt will soon dry out and crack, and then your roof will be susceptible to leaks.
  • Shingles are cupped and curled:

    Curled-up old shingles

    This issue looks bad, but more importantly, it means wind-driven moisture can easily get under the shingles and into your roof deck where it might cause leaks and rot.

  • Shingles are cracked: The cracked areas aren’t keeping moisture off the deck, and the risk of leaks goes way up.

    Cracks or thermal splitting in asphalt shingles

    via Structure Tech

  • Your neighbors are getting new roofs: This is more than “keeping up with the Joneses.” When homes built about the same time as yours are being re-roofed, your roof is probably about due.
  • You’ve experienced multiple leaks: Your roof is an entire structure, not just the shingles. Deck paper, flashing, moisture barrier in valleys, starter shingles, vent stack boots and other components are part of an entire roofing system. As the roof ages and several of its components or locations fail, the roof should be replaced.
  • The roof has experienced major damage:

    hail damaged roof shingles

    If more than about 35% of your roof is going to need repair due to wind or hail, especially if it’s already 12+ years old, the cost-effective decision might be to replace it all.

    Repair is costlier on a per square foot basis because it is more time-consuming to integrate new shingles into a roof “here and there” than to install them over the entire roof. Plus, a mix of old shingles and new just won’t look very good.

  • Your roof looks bad: Cosmetics and aesthetics do matter to homeowners and potential buyers. If your roof is worn, has algae staining that won’t clean up or has patches of moss on it, boosting its appearance with a new layer of shingles will make a very nice difference.

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If none of these reasons to get a new roof apply, then you’re probably done here! If you’re not sure about your roof’s condition, hiring a home inspector or roofing contractor to inspect it can be a preventative measure before a roof failure and the extensive and expensive damage it can cause.

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