Roof Replacement Cost 2020: New Roof Installation Prices per Sq.Ft.

It’s time to replace that scrappy old roof. Are you wondering how much it will cost to install a new roof on your home or garage? If so, check out our just-updated new roof pricing guide for homeowners.

A beautiful cabin with a combination roof

Straight off the bat: It needs to be stated that not all roofs are made the same and not all roofers charge the same prices. That said, on average, most contractors will charge between $3.50 and $5.50 per square foot or $350 to $550 per square (100 sq.ft.) to install or replace an asphalt shingle roof on a typical house.

Thus, at the mid point of the above price range, you can expect to pay about $4.50 per sq. ft. or $450 per square to replace an asphalt shingle roof on a typical single-family house.

A typical roof replacement quote will normally include the removal and disposal of up to two layers of old shingles. It should also include the installation of new underlayment such as the 30-pound roofing felt, chimney re-flashing, and ice-and-water shield at the eaves and valleys of the roof, as required by the local building code. The quote should also include a 5 or 10-year workmanship warranty.

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Note: For homeowners who live in large and expensive coastal cities like Seattle, Portland, Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego, New York City, Boston, and Washington DC, the average quoted residential roofing prices will range from $4.50 to $7.50 per square foot or $450 to $750 per square of asphalt shingles installed or replaced. The higher prices in coastal areas are due to the higher local cost of living, and hence the higher cost of doing business. Booming local real estate values also drive up the demand and prices for professional remodeling services.

Did you know? The average residential roof size in the US is about 1,700 square feet or 17 squares, although there are many larger homes with roofs that are twice as large.

All professional roofers use “squares” to measure and estimate roofs. A square is equal to 100 square feet of the 3-dimensional roof surface.

Project pricing examples: Based on the $350 to $550 per square pricing range, you can expect to pay between $6,000 and $9,350 for a typical 17 squares asphalt shingle roof replacement project.

For comparison, a 30 squares roof on a larger house will cost between $10,500 and $16,500 for a basic 30-year architectural asphalt shingle roof fully installed.

What About Prices for Other, Less-Common Roofing Systems?

While nearly 70 percent of all roofs in the US are covered with composition shingles (a composite of fiberglass mat, and asphalt and minerals/stone granules), there are many different roofing options for steep and low-slope roofs.

Below is a quick reference to help you compare average prices for the most common roofing systems based on a 17-squares residential roof:

Basic 3-Tab (25-year) shingles: $6,000 to $7,500
30-year architectural shingles: $7,000 to $9,500
50-year premium shingles: $8,500 to $12,750
G-90 steel shingles or stone-coated steel tiles: $11,900 to $17,000
Aluminum shingles: $12,750 to $18,700
Cedar shingles or shakes: $13,000 to $20,400
Standing seam: $14,450 to $20,400
Concrete tiles: $13,600 to $23,800 (roof-frame requires reinforcement)
Natural slate tiles: $15,300 to $30,600 (roof-frame requires reinforcement)
Synthetic shakes and slate tiles: $13,000 to $20,400
Clay tiles: $17,000 to $30,600 (roof-frame requires reinforcement)

Install Roof Shingles

$7,500
Average price
Install Metal Roof

$14,500
Average price
Install Flat Roof

$8,225
Average price

See costs in your area Start Here - Enter Your Zip Code

Note that every market is different, but even within the same market, different companies will charge different prices. That’s why it’s important to get at least a few quotes from reputable pros in your area.

All else being equal, professional roofers in expensive coastal areas (such as homes in Boston, New York City, Washington DC, Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Portland OR, and Seattle WA) will charge more for their services compared to roofing contractors in the south, mid west, or rural areas.

Asphalt Shingles Materials and Installation Costs

Many professional roofing contractors employ a “40% materials / 60% labor” as their costs-breakdown formula. Of course, this pricing structure is just a guideline not set in stone. Some contractors include their overhead in the cost of labor, while others calculate it separately.

asphalt shingles material and installation pricing specs breakdown

Below is the breakdown of typical costs you can expect for materials and professional installation:

1. 3-tab Shingles
2. 30-Year Architectural Shingles
3. Premium Shingles

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How to Get Insurance to Pay for Your Roof Replacement in 2020

Many homeowners who have been through the nightmare of having to deal with the roof damage and trying to get their claim approved by the insurance company will agree: sometimes, it can be very difficult to get a claim paid.

So, how do you get your insurance company to pay for a roof replacement? The answer involves a combination of information, preparation, documentation and hiring a professional roofer to work on your behalf.

Understand Your Insurance Coverage

Knowledge is power. Don’t let your insurance company tell you what’s covered and what isn’t.

Most of us don’t read the fine print of the policy until something goes wrong. Now is the time to do that. If you don’t have a copy of the policy, a common problem, request one from your agent. A paper copy or electronic file should be made available promptly.

In most states, there are two types of coverage: Repair coverage and replacement coverage.

Replacement policies are more common, though they do cost more. Replacement coverage provides for returning the roof to a brand new condition when an event that is covered by the insurance policy takes place.

Repair coverage usually takes into consideration depreciation of the roof. This means you will get a percentage of the replacement cost based on the roof’s material and age. It could be as low as 15% for a roof near the end of its service life.

Read your policy carefully. If the language is confusing, ask questions.

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Roofing Shingles Vs. Cedar Shakes Costs, Plus Pros & Cons in 2020

In this guide, we present a side-by-side comparison of cedar shingles and shakes vs. asphalt roofing, with focus on on material composition, installation costs, plus pros and cons and ROI of each option. Let’s get started!

The Difference Between Wood Shingles & Cedar Shakes

When used in roof covering, wood can be either shakes or shingles. Wood shakes have been used for centuries. They are split from logs and often left as split to retain the textured, rough-hewn effect.

Cedar shakes around a skylight Source: Kuhl’s Contracting

A wood shake is instantly recognizable by its thick butt end. With the advent of commercial sawmills a wood shake was often sawn after splitting to achieve a uniform back side.

These sawmills also produced a completely uniform product with an even taper and identical thickness by sawing shakes on both sides. This manufactured product is known as a wood shingle.

California redwood, western red cedar, cypress, spruce and pine are all used to manufacture wood shakes and shingles. Cedar is the most popular wood for shakes, southern yellow pine is also popular. Wood shakes and shingles can be pressure treated with fire retardants and chemical preservatives.

Types of Asphalt Shingles

Asphalt or composition shingles are most commonly constructed from organic material or fiberglass. Asphalt shingles are built upon a base or mat that was originally made of absorbent cotton rags.

Roofing Shingles Display

Later, more readily available wood pulp or paper replaced the natural fibers. Asphalt was poured onto that base, known as “felt”.

In the 1970s, fibrous glass was introduced, which did not rot like the organic materials. Today, 95 percent of asphalt shingles feature fiberglass felt.

Cedar Shingles/Shakes Cost Vs. Asphalt

In the roofing industry, an 18-inch wood shingle is referred to as “Perfection” and 24-inch wide shingles are known as “Royal.” A wood shake is a premium product, costing around $3.50 per square foot versus $2.50 a square foot for wood shingles.

Cedar Shakes Siding and Asphalt Roof By Red House Architects

The most expensive option for shingling a roof is wood shakes — between $7.50 to $12.50 per square foot or $750 and $1,250 per square (100 square feet), installed.

Cedar Shakes Roof By Linda McDougald Design

Wood shingles are slightly less pricey at $6.50 to $10.50 per square foot or $650 to $1,050 per square, installed.

For comparison, asphalt roofing can cost as little as $3.50 to $5.50 per square foot or $350 to $550 per square, installed.

Roofing Shingles Installation

Install Roof Shingles

$7,500
Average price
Install Metal Roof

$14,500
Average price
Install Flat Roof

$8,225
Average price

See costs in your area Start Here - Enter Your Zip Code

So, why do homeowners opt for the much more expensive wood shingling? The answer is…

Aesthetics

It is hard to beat the appearance of a natural wood roof. If you are making over a traditional older house, cedar roofing is probably the historically appropriate choice. Not that asphalt shingles are an unattractive alternative.

Asphalt shingles come in a wide variety of colors and shapes and patterned asphalt roofs can be eye-catching in their own right.

Beyond looking great, wood shingling does not win many comparison battles with its asphalt-covered competition. Let’s explore some of the pros and cons up on your roof…

Longevity

Life expectancy for both asphalt and wood shingles is a tricky matter. Let’s tick off all the factors that can affect the longevity of a roof covering: quality of installation, diligence of maintenance, quality of materials, age of the house, overhanging trees, climate and foot traffic.

Chemically treated wood will outlast untreated shakes and shingles and a shake will survive longer than a shingle. Both asphalt and treated wood shingles can survive up to 30 years on a roof, given ideal conditions.

Durability Cedar shingles are resistant to insects but not large amounts of rain. Cedar shakes in a damp environment are susceptible to mold and mildew and rot.

Sap from overhanging trees will encourage mildew. When rot sets in it has likely affected more than a single shake and the entire roof is a candidate for replacement.

Cleaning Costs

Asphalt has its own weather issues. Algae is more likely to take hold on an asphalt roof than cedar shakes. While this will not hamper your roof’s protection abilities, it does lead to unsightly staining and premature replacement on appearance grounds, especially at resale time.

Cleaning either a asphalt or wood shingle roof with a solution of water and bleach applied professionally and gently with a powerwasher will run from $25 to $30 per square. And this is a job best left to competent professionals as a poorly handled powerwasher can wreak havoc on roof shingles.

Flammability

Some building codes where fire is a danger restrict or ban the use of wood shingling altogether. Asphalt shingles have a high resistance to flames.

Keep in mind that wood shakes and shingles can be pressure treated with fire retardants and chemical preservatives.

Wind and Impact Resistance

Cedar shakes and shingles are the clear winner here. Both have proven to be highly impact-resistant and have tested to withstand wind speeds of up to 245 miles per hour (which your house will never see).

Asphalt shingles will, however, blow off a roof in high winds. Fallen branches are also much more likely to damage an asphalt shingle that a wooden one.

Maintenance

Cedar is a high maintenance material. For starters, the wood needs to breathe and the roof must be kept clear of leaves, branches and debris.

Gutters must be regularly cleaned and ventilation kept open for air to flow around the shakes and shingles.

Topical treatments can be applied as water repellents and ultraviolet inhibitors that can prevent graying of a roof.

If individual shakes or shingles are required they will match the composition and color of the original roof – score one point for cedar.

While algae will not impair the performance of asphalt shingles, mosses that grow on a damp roof can cause the edges to lift or curl leaving them vulnerable to a blow-off in storms.

Moss can be removed with a 50:50 mix of laundry-strength liquid chlorine bleach and water soaked with a low-pressure sprayer.

The moss will eventually loosen and can be swept off the roof. It will return, however, if many of the same measures as keeping a wood roof dry – trimming tree branches, removing debris and clearing gutters — are not followed. Replacing individual shingles is often a DIY job.

ROI, Property Valuations, and Curb Appeal Considerations

In terms of property valuations, replacing a cedar roof with asphalt will instantly diminish the value of your property. — On some historic homes, as well as homes surrounded by other homes roofed with cedar, such as in historic districts/neighborhoods, this may not even be an option to begin with.

However, if you must replace a cedar roof with something else, then opting for a metal roof rather than asphalt will help preserve the valuation and curb appeal of your property.

Conclusion

On the cost and maintenance considerations – the “Big Two” for most homeowners – asphalt shingles are the clear choice over wood shakes.

And in fact, about 70 percent of American roofs are covered with asphalt shingles today. On the other hand, those wood shingled-roofs just look so darn good, don’t they? 😉


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Start Here Enter Your Zip Code: