Roof Shingle Colors – How to Pick the Best Asphalt Shingle Color for your Home?

The roof accounts for as much as 25 to 40 percent of your home’s visible exterior and plays a key role in how your home is perceived from the street.

That’s why it is crucial to pick the right shingle color, especially if you want to enhance your home’s overall curb appeal and present it in the best possible light.

What to expect: This guide offers practical and proven tips for choosing the right asphalt shingle color to achieve that WOW effect in highlighting the beauty of your home.

The advice provided below will help your achieve visual harmony with respect to how well the roof color integrates with the rest of your home’s exterior and its surrounding environment. Let’s get started.

Coordinate with Siding and Shutters

Interior designers don’t randomly pick pretty colors for flooring, cabinets, countertops and walls without regard to the big picture.

All colors have to work together to achieve a whole that is visually coordinated and appealing.

The same is true for your home’s exterior. First, the roof color should be dissimilar enough to provide contrast.

A dark brown roof would be boring with wood siding stained dark. Brown shingles would work with beige siding, a mild contrast, or with white, a more distinct contrast.

Also, when the roof color picks up tones in window shutters, the front door or accent trim, it nicely ties together the exterior look.

The table below shows roof colors that integrate best with siding colors.

House Siding Color: Best Matching Roof Colors:
Red Black, dark gray, dark brown, dark green
White Brown, black, green, gray, blue, red
Gray Black, dark gray, dark blue, dark green, white
Beige/Tan Brown, black, dark green, dark blue
Brown Green, black, blue, charcoal and browns that are lighter or darker
Blue Black, brown, gray, white

Know When to Use Color Blends

Asphalt shingle lines are produced in solid colors and blends. For example, CertainTeed Landmark shingles in Hunter Green show no variation. They’re just deep green.

CertainTeed Landmark Hunter Green

By contrast, Landmark Heather Blend shingles are a mix of several brown tones and rust too.

Landmark Heather Blend

Owens Corning Duration Designer shingles in multiple blends are even more varied.

Duration Designer Shingles Aged Copper

Now, here’s the blending principle: The plainer the siding is, the more a blended color pattern is needed to make your home interesting.

A solid black roof on a home with dark brown wood siding creates a boring combination.

The same home with shingles that have a charcoal base but flecked with greens, tans and browns is much more appealing.

On the other hand, if your home’s siding is varied – perhaps brick featuring multiple shades or an elegant stone front with varied colors – then color-blended shingles with clash.

You wouldn’t wear a patterned shirt with a patterned skirt or pants, right? Go solid on the roof when the home shows variation.

Here’s an example of Landmark Driftwood shingles that fail in this regard. The result is a busy clash. The colors aren’t coordinated either.

Shingle colors clashing with the house exterior

The stone veneer on the house above is arguably quite busy, and so is the roof. The plain white color on the rest of the house helps to balance the appearance, though.

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Metal Roofing Cost vs. Asphalt Shingles: Metal Roof Prices 2019

If you are a homeowner considering installing a new metal roof on your house, then undoubtedly, one of the burning questions on your mind is how much will it cost?

On average, you can expect to pay between $6.50 and $14.00 per square foot of metal roofing installed. Granted, this is a pretty wide pricing range, but you can expect a metal shingle roof to average between $7.50 to $11.00 per square foot installed, while a standing seam metal roof will cost between $9.00 to $14.00 per square foot installed.

Now, assuming the average cost of $10.00 per square foot of metal roofing installed on an average-sized roof, it will cost about $17,000 to install approximately 17 squares or 1,700 square feet of metal roofing on a typical house.

The low-end cost for steel shingles installed over-top of the existing 17-square roof would be around $14,500 at $850 per square, while the cost of a high-end aluminum standing seam would be about $23,800 at $1,400 per square for a comparable roof.

Install Roof Shingles

$7,500
Average price
Install Metal Roof

$14,500
Average price
Install Flat Roof

$8,225
Average price

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If you opt for a less-costly option such as corrugated or ribbed steel roof, your cost will likely fall within $4.00 to $6.50 per square foot installed or $400 to $650 per square, depending on the metal thickness (gauges for steel or mils for aluminum) and the quality of paint finish (acrylic vs. Kynar 500 or Hylar 5000) for the system being installed, as well as your home’s geographic location.

a-rugged-standing-seam-metal-roof

Important Points to Keep in Mind:

When it comes to residential metal roofing, you are not only paying more for a higher quality and longer-lasting material than asphalt shingle, but you are also paying for a far more costly, professional installation that requires specialized skills, expertise, and equipment.

Keep in mind that there are a number of factors that may influence your final price for a new metal roof. These include the type of metal and the roof style you choose, your geographic location, and the overall complexity of the roof.

Pricing breakdown by System and What to Expect:

1. Introduction to our Pricing Guide
2. Understanding the High Cost of Labor to Install Metal Roofing
3. Steel Shingles, Standing Seam, and Stone-Coated Steel Roofs
4. Aluminum Shingles and Standing Seam
5. Copper and Zinc
6. Paint Finish Quality
7. Metal Roof Colors
8. Effects of Location on Price
9. Why a Metal Roof is a Smart Investment

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1. What to Expect From This Guide

Our pricing guide will walk you through all the main factors determining the cost of a metal roof. You will learn how much you can expect to pay for most popular types of metal roofing materials and how much it will cost to install the system of your choice.

Once you understand how the pricing work and decide on the type of system you want to install, you can then confidently negotiate with any contractor, as well as shop around to get the best deal possible in your area, without sacrificing on quality.

Did you know? The Total Amount of Labor Required to Install a Metal Roof is the Most Significant Cost Factor!

A beautiful cabin with combination roof

As a general rule of thumb, the greater the square footage of your roof, the less you can expect to pay on a per square foot basis for your choice of metal roofing material, especially if you opt for standing seam panels.

Did you know? Small-size orders requiring less than 300 sq. ft. or three squares of custom-sized sheet metal panels can be surprisingly expensive!

If you have a complex roof with multiple cut-up angles, dormers, sidewalls, chimneys and/or skylights requiring metal flashing, then your total installation cost will be proportionally higher.

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Rafters Vs. Trusses – What’s the Difference Between Rafters & Trusses?

It is common to read that “rafters are the way they used to frame roofs. Now everyone uses trusses.” First, that is plain wrong, and an oversimplification at best.

Secondly, rafters can have important advantages over trusses in certain building projects; If you’re planning an out-of-the-ordinary, custom roof design or want to make use of the attic space, then rafters might be more appropriate.

In this guide, we will define roof trusses and rafters and explain the pros and cons of each for comparison. We will also outline the best uses of each, so you can decide whether rafters or trusses are the right choice for your building project.

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