Pros & Cons of IKO Shingles – Costs – Unbiased IKO Roofing Reviews

IKO asphalt shingles enjoy moderate sales volume across the US and have been one of Canada’s top brands. Most IKO shingles are sold directly to roofing contractors through distributors. In Canada, Lowe’s and other retailers sell IKO shingles to the public.

IKO asphalt shingles roof

Did you know? Average IKO consumer ratings are poor, dragged down by widespread failure of organic shingles and the Cambridge AR line. The company is the target of class action lawsuits in the US and Canada. However, the defective shingle lines are no longer produced and IKO has been working hard on improving formulations across the board.

We mention this upfront because the lawsuits appear prominently in online search results for IKO shingles. Homeowners who had the defective shingles installed despise the company. The remaining reviews and ratings from homeowners are about average compared with other top brands. Warranties are slightly above average, as discussed below.

Are IKO Shingles the Right Choice for Your Home?

This guide provides a critical look at the current lineup of IKO shingles from the perspective of homeowners, home inspectors, and roofing contractors.

We believe this is the best approach to getting a well-rounded view of any shingle brand. It’s how we structured our reviews of GAF and Malarkey shingles among others.

Pros

Here are the advantages offered by this brand from various perspectives.

There are two reasons roofers suggest IKO products:

1. IKO Pro4 Complete Roofing System

A roof is far more than the outer covering of shingles. It’s built from the deck up using multiple components that work together to effectively shed rainwater and keep your home protected from nature’s elements.

IKO Pro 4 Roofing System via All State Remodeling

Here are the 4 components of the Pro4 roof system:

1) GoldShield, ArmourGard and StormShield eave protection defend the roof against wind-driven rain and ice dams. IKO recommends eave protection in valleys and around protrusions like vents and skylights.

2) RoofGard-Cool Grey or Stormtite synthetic underlayment options are chosen based on local climate.

3) Leading Edge Plus starter strips are installed at eaves and rakes as an extra line of defense where it’s needed most.

4) Three ridge cap shingle options give roofers choices for matching the profile of the shingle.

The above listed product components and accessories are compatible with all IKO shingle lines.

Did you know? In order to be covered by IKO’s best warranty, the roof must be installed with one of the IKO hip and ridge shingle options: Hip & Ridge Plus, Hip & Ridge 12 or Ultra HP.

The above requirement is standard for most brands. Some manufacturers, like GAF, require that at least two other GAF components be used.

These requirements help the manufacturer maximize material sales per job, which helps cover their risk for giving the better warranty coverage.

No tear-off, no problem! There’s an advantage here to using IKO. Most other shingle brands require using their underlayment, and that means the best warranties are only available when the old roofing is removed (a tear-off). IKO doesn’t require a tear-off to get the better warranty.

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Roof Replacement Cost 2020: New Roof Installation Prices per Sq.Ft.

It’s time to replace that scrappy old roof. Are you wondering how much it will cost to install a new roof on your home or garage? If so, check out our just-updated new roof pricing guide for homeowners.

A beautiful cabin with a combination roof

Straight off the bat: It needs to be stated that not all roofs are made the same and not all roofers charge the same prices. That said, on average, most contractors will charge between $3.50 and $5.50 per square foot or $350 to $550 per square (100 sq.ft.) to install or replace an asphalt shingle roof on a typical house.

Thus, at the mid point of the above price range, you can expect to pay about $4.50 per sq. ft. or $450 per square to replace an asphalt shingle roof on a typical single-family house.

A typical roof replacement quote will normally include the removal and disposal of up to two layers of old shingles. It should also include the installation of new underlayment such as the 30-pound roofing felt, chimney re-flashing, and ice-and-water shield at the eaves and valleys of the roof, as required by the local building code. The quote should also include a 5 or 10-year workmanship warranty.

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Note: For homeowners who live in large and expensive coastal cities like Seattle, Portland, Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego, New York City, Boston, and Washington DC, the average quoted residential roofing prices will range from $4.50 to $7.50 per square foot or $450 to $750 per square of asphalt shingles installed or replaced. The higher prices in coastal areas are due to the higher local cost of living, and hence the higher cost of doing business. Booming local real estate values also drive up the demand and prices for professional remodeling services.

Did you know? The average residential roof size in the US is about 1,700 square feet or 17 squares, although there are many larger homes with roofs that are twice as large.

All professional roofers use “squares” to measure and estimate roofs. A square is equal to 100 square feet of the 3-dimensional roof surface.

Project pricing examples: Based on the $350 to $550 per square pricing range, you can expect to pay between $6,000 and $9,350 for a typical 17 squares asphalt shingle roof replacement project.

For comparison, a 30 squares roof on a larger house will cost between $10,500 and $16,500 for a basic 30-year architectural asphalt shingle roof fully installed.

What About Prices for Other, Less-Common Roofing Systems?

While nearly 70 percent of all roofs in the US are covered with composition shingles (a composite of fiberglass mat, and asphalt and minerals/stone granules), there are many different roofing options for steep and low-slope roofs.

Below is a quick reference to help you compare average prices for the most common roofing systems based on a 17-squares residential roof:

Basic 3-Tab (25-year) shingles: $6,000 to $7,500
30-year architectural shingles: $7,000 to $9,500
50-year premium shingles: $8,500 to $12,750
G-90 steel shingles or stone-coated steel tiles: $11,900 to $17,000
Aluminum shingles: $12,750 to $18,700
Cedar shingles or shakes: $13,000 to $20,400
Standing seam: $14,450 to $20,400
Concrete tiles: $13,600 to $23,800 (roof-frame requires reinforcement)
Natural slate tiles: $15,300 to $30,600 (roof-frame requires reinforcement)
Synthetic shakes and slate tiles: $13,000 to $20,400
Clay tiles: $17,000 to $30,600 (roof-frame requires reinforcement)

Install Roof Shingles

$7,500
Average price
Install Metal Roof

$14,500
Average price
Install Flat Roof

$8,225
Average price

See costs in your area Start Here - Enter Your Zip Code

Note that every market is different, but even within the same market, different companies will charge different prices. That’s why it’s important to get at least a few quotes from reputable pros in your area.

All else being equal, professional roofers in expensive coastal areas (such as homes in Boston, New York City, Washington DC, Miami, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Portland OR, and Seattle WA) will charge more for their services compared to roofing contractors in the south, mid west, or rural areas.

Asphalt Shingles Materials and Installation Costs

Many professional roofing contractors employ a “40% materials / 60% labor” as their costs-breakdown formula. Of course, this pricing structure is just a guideline not set in stone. Some contractors include their overhead in the cost of labor, while others calculate it separately.

asphalt shingles material and installation pricing specs breakdown

Below is the breakdown of typical costs you can expect for materials and professional installation:

1. 3-tab Shingles
2. 30-Year Architectural Shingles
3. Premium Shingles

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Flat Roof Materials & Installation Costs 2020: PVC vs. TPO, EPDM Rubber, BUR, Modified Bitumen, Spray-on Coating

When it comes to covering up a flat roof, your options are both limited and expansive. What that means in a nutshell is that your traditional roofing materials such as asphalt shingles, concrete tiles, and corrugated metal are out of the window. That being said, flat roof systems such as PVC, TPO, EPDM rubber, and others, each have their distinct pros and cons.

EPDM Rubber installed on a flat roof by GemTile

So why can’t you put traditional roofing materials on a flat roof? Well, technically you can, but they are almost guaranteed to leak! 😉

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Systems like asphalt shingles and concrete or clay tiles are installed by overlapping one row on top of another. They work cohesively with the pitch of the roof to shed rainwater and snow as it falls from the sky. Since flat roofs have little to no pitch, the water would work itself underneath the shingles or tiles, eventually rotting the substrate and causing leaks on your interior.

Covering a flat roof is a whole different animal than shingling a pitched one. On a flat roof, generally speaking, you want to avoid any types of seams, if at all possible.

The biggest threat is of course going to be water, which WILL find any access though any hole or inadequately-sealed seams in the roofing membrane.

Your main goal when covering a flat roof is to create a barrier that will be impenetrable to water.

How do you make an item (besides a roof) impenetrable to water? You can either apply something physical such as a tarp, or coat it with a material to create a barrier like you would via deck stain or lacquer. Roofs follow this same premise –- either physically cover it with something like a PVC membrane or apply a coating such as tar or spray on silicon.

Flat Roof Costs:

It’s easy to assume that a flat roof would be far less expensive to apply material to than a pitched one. For access reasons alone it would seem it’s a lot easier to roof a flat surface than one that is steep and requires a harnesses and braces to move around.

Install Roof Shingles

$7,500
Average price
Install Metal Roof

$14,500
Average price
Install Flat Roof

$8,225
Average price

See costs in your area Start Here - Enter Your Zip Code

Many roofing contractors will tell you though that working on flat surfaces is actually harder on the back.

Take into account that flat roofs often require the application of adhesives and some types such as modified bitumen are installed with a torch that heats up the seal.

Installation costs can be just as high for a flat roof as they would be a 10/12 pitch.

Labor prices will vary depending on your area. You can get a good idea of the estimated cost to cover your flat roof based on the average material prices.

  • PVC Membrane – aside from the membrane itself, an insulation board must first be installed to provide a suitable substrate and to help with the energy costs. The membrane is typically installed in rows comprised of six foot wide PVC membrane, plus an overlap of 6 to 8 inches. Each row of rolled membrane must be mechanically attached and hot-air welded at the seams with overlapping rows of PVC membrane.

    Immediately next to the roof edge and throughout the outer perimeter of the roof, a three foot wide PVC membrane is used to help prevent the wind uplift.

    The edges of each row are mechanically fastened (using plates and screws) to the roof deck before the seams are hot air welded to help prevent uplift.

    Some installers will employ a fully-adhered or glued to the roof deck rather than mechanically-attached installation method to help prevent wind uplift. All else being equal, the fully-adhered membrane will cost more than mechanically attached one.

    All in total, the installation of a PVC roofing membrane such as that from IB Roof (residential and commercial vendor) or Sika Sarnafil (mostly commercial vendor) will cost between $7.50 and $12.50 per square foot, depending on the membrane type, scope of the project, roof accessibility, and project location.

  • EPDM Rubber – manufacturers try to avoid seams with EPDM membrane sizes that can reach 50′ wide by 200′ long. These huge pieces are great for avoiding possible leaks at the seams, but these wide rolls are also very difficult to handle during the installation.

    EPDM membranes install like a giant sticker, but this must be done slowly and with precision to avoid air bubbles.

    Typically, EPDM rubber will cost between $6.50 and $10.50 per square foot installed.

  • TPO – insulation boards are first fastened to the roof substrate. TPO also comes in rolls and can be mechanically fastened to the insulation boards or installed with the self-adhesive. Costs are approximately $6.50 to $10.50 per square foot installed.
  • Modified Bitumen – modified bitumen is installed in multiple layers, each of which is torched to the surface below at every ¼ turn of the roll. This is a very labor intensive process that absolutely must be performed by a professional. This type of roof does have cold-rolled technologies available now as well, but it involves a lot of application of roofing tar. Estimated costs are $4.50 to $8.50 per square foot installed.
  • Built Up Roof – installation includes applying multiple layers of ply sheets that are bonded together using hot asphalt. The top layer can be a reflective coating for energy efficiency or gravel for added durability. Costs range from $6.50 to $9.50 per square foot installed.
  • Spray-On Roof – applying a spray to a roof sounds easy. The material can be applied right over an existing roof so little to no prep work is needed besides cleaning. It’s still important to apply the spray evenly and delicately though.

    The material itself will also determine the cost as polyurethane foam can be applied for as little as $3.50 per square foot and acrylic $6.50 per square foot.

    Silicon is the agreed upon premier spray application, but the material costs can drive installation prices up to $7.50 to $12.50 per square foot or more.

Choosing an appropriate flat roofing material is a two-part process. On one hand you want a substance that has nice aesthetics while fitting within your budget. You also want to know the product will last:

Materials Life-Span

The life span of your flat roof depends on a lot of different factors starting with proper installation. If your climate has rapid changes that see Spring, Summer, and Winter in the same week, the material will be put under more stress which will reduce its life span.

A roof that is accessed a lot will also wear down faster. Here is what you can expect from the popular materials in terms of longevity:

  • PVC – 15 to 30 years.
  • EPDM – 10 to 15 years.
  • TPO – 7 to 20 years.
  • Bitumen – 10 to 20 years.
  • Built Up Roof – 15 to 20 years.
  • Spray-On – up to 20 years.

Why Do Flat Roofs Exist?

Before we get into comparisons of different flat roofing materials, it’s important to know why they exist in the first place since they’re seemingly such a hassle and an almost-immanent leak threat.

There are two main reasons behind why a contractor would call for a flat roof: 1) aesthetics and 2) convenience.

For example, when you’re adding on to a home (building an addition) with something like a three-seasons room, a flat roof simply looks nicer. Homes with unblended roof pitches can be an awkward eyesore.

In commercial buildings, flat roofs, outright, offer a more convenient place to install outdoor HVAC units rather than putting them in high-traffic ground areas.

Of course, any roof’s main job is to create a barrier of protection between the building below and the atmosphere above. Therein lies the conundrum associated with flat roofing. For all the aesthetics and convenience, the design doesn’t do a lot to avoid snow and water buildup.

To be fair, flat roofs aren’t completely ‘bubble-level’ flat. They work in much the same way as a gutter system, angled slightly or pitched a couple of degrees, so that water can flow into a downspout. Even so, flat roofing materials need to be able to absorb the brunt of the weather and to withstand ponding water or snow and ice until it melts.

Pros and Cons of Common Flat Roof Membranes

Whether you have a commercial or residential building, some type of roof covering is 100% mandatory. There are generally 5 to 6 different routes to take regarding the materials needed for roofing a flat surface:

1. PVC
2. EPDM
3. TPO
4. Modified Bitumen
5. BUR
6. Spray on Coating

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