Asphalt Shingles Roofing: 3-Tab Vs. Architectural Shingles Cost 2020

For most homeowners looking to do a re-roofing job on a budget while maintaining a fairly attractive look and weather tightness of their home, a composition shingles roof aka asphalt is perhaps the most plausible, simple, and cost-effective solution.

In a highly competitive residential roofing market saturated with numerous options, asphalt shingles are by far one of the most popular choices.

While not as durable and long-lasting as some of the more premium roofing materials such as metal, cedar shakes, slate, or clay tiles, asphalt shingles can provide an adequate protection and sufficient aesthetic appeal at only a fraction of the cost of other systems.

In this guide you will learn about advantages and disadvantages of composition shingle roofs to help you decide if this popular roofing option is the best fit for your home.

Two Types of Asphalt Shingles:

asphalt-shingles-roof Asphalt shingles come in two types: organic and fiberglass:

Old School Organic shingles are based on paper (waste paper) saturated with asphalt to make it waterproof, with coatings of adhesive salt and ceramic granules embedded on top.

Fiberglass shingles are made with a base layer of glass fiber reinforcing mat. This mat is coated with asphalt, which contains mineral fillers and makes the shingle waterproof.

While organic shingles are more durable than fiberglass ones, they are more flammable and hence more prone to fire. They are less environmentally-friendly due to their high asphalt (oil based) content.

Fiberglass shingles offer excellent fire protection. Today, fiberglass shingles are more commonly used and are rapidly replacing the organic shingles.

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Fiber Cement Siding Cost 2020: HardiePlank Installation Cost per Sq.Ft.

In recent years, fiber cement siding has emerged as a viable and attractive alternative to the less-costly and more common vinyl siding.

Hardieplank fiber cement lap siding on a house

In this guide, we’ll explore the costs and pros and cons of fiber cement siding for residential retrofits in 2019.

Cost

On average, you can expect to pay anywhere from $7.50 to $13.50 per square foot or $750 to $1,350 per square to install fiber cement siding on a typical house. A square is equal to 100 square feet.

The cost of professional installation will include all the necessary materials, labor, permitting, debris removal and disposal, and warranty.

That being said, a typical fiber cement siding job (such as new HardiePlank or Allura lap siding) on average will cost between $15,000 to $27,000 to complete.

The actual price for the job will vary with the size of the house, overall level of job difficulty, accessibility, and location. All things being equal, booming metro areas will be pricier than remote rural areas.

Note: On residential retrofits and exterior remodeling projects, a typical fiber cement siding installation will involve the removal and disposal of existing siding, thus adding an additional cost to the project.

Pro Tip: All fiber cement siding installations should include a weather-resistant barrier to allow the building to breathe and help prevent mold and mildew growth.


Example of a Typical Job Estimate

For instance, at an average cost of $850.00 per square (100 square feet), it will cost about $17,000 to install about 2,000 sq. ft. or 20 squares of fiber cement siding on a typical two-story house.

fiber-cement-siding-on-a-large-house

Did you know? Fiber cement siding installation costs are similar to wood siding and engineered wood composite siding, but are more expensive than vinyl.

Your home’s location and the company you choose to hire will have a major influence on the total cost of your project.

Material Costs

The price for fiber cement siding will vary depending on thickness of the panels – from 7/16 of an inch to one inch and the finish and styling chosen. Fiber cement siding such as HardiePlank® Lap Siding is sold in panels and traditional clapboards. Clapboards range from 4 inches to 12 inches wide. A standard length is 12 feet. The finish can be smooth, wood-grained or rough-sawn.

Fiber cement can also be shaped like siding shakes and shingles that are produced in strips or individual pieces. For instance, HardieShingle® siding is designed to replicate the look of cedar shingle siding often installed on Cape Cod-style homes, relaxed cottages, or ranch-style homes in a wooded setting.

Styles can include wood-grain and hand-split in 4-, 8- and 12-foot strips that are set in straight or staggered courses. Fiber cement in any configuration can be custom-fabricated for climate specificity.

Expect to pay from $150 per square (100 square feet) to $300 per square in material costs.

Installation Costs

Hardie Plank Fiber Cement Siding on a Cottage style home

Installation will typically cost between $350 and $850 per square (100 sq. ft.), depending on the complexity of the job, your location, and the company you choose to hire.

Fiber cement siding is heavy — about 2.5 pounds per square foot — and delicate. It is also flexible.

Did you Know? Carrying fiber cement siding around a job site is a two-man job, so it will not crack; panels should always be transported vertically and not horizontally to again guard against cracking.

Toss in specialized tools and fasteners, unique cutting requirements and an expertise in not over-driving the fasteners into the studs, and the installation of fiber cement siding becomes a job best saved for professional installers.

ROI and Recouped Value

fiber-cement-siding-on-gambrel-house

Last year, fiber cement siding installations resulted in an average of 80% to 85% in recouped value (cost-to-value return at a resale), making it one of the best-valued exterior remodeling upgrades of the year.


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Roof Shingle Colors – How to Pick the Best Roof Color for Your Home?

The roof accounts for as much as 25 to 40 percent of your home’s visible exterior and plays a key role in how your home is perceived from the street.

That’s why it is crucial to pick the right shingle color, especially if you want to enhance your home’s overall curb appeal and present it in the best possible light.

What to expect: This guide offers practical and proven tips for choosing the right asphalt shingle color to achieve that WOW effect in highlighting the beauty of your home.

The advice provided below will help your achieve visual harmony with respect to how well the roof color integrates with the rest of your home’s exterior and its surrounding environment. Let’s get started.

Coordinate with Siding and Shutters

Interior designers don’t randomly pick pretty colors for flooring, cabinets, countertops and walls without regard to the big picture.

All colors have to work together to achieve a whole that is visually coordinated and appealing.

The same is true for your home’s exterior. First, the roof color should be dissimilar enough to provide contrast.

A dark brown roof would be boring with wood siding stained dark. Brown shingles would work with beige siding, a mild contrast, or with white, a more distinct contrast.

Also, when the roof color picks up tones in window shutters, the front door or accent trim, it nicely ties together the exterior look.

The table below shows roof colors that integrate best with siding colors.

House Siding Color: Best Matching Roof Colors:
Red Black, dark gray, dark brown, dark green
White Brown, black, green, gray, blue, red
Gray Black, dark gray, dark blue, dark green, white
Beige/Tan Brown, black, dark green, dark blue
Brown Green, black, blue, charcoal and browns that are lighter or darker
Blue Black, brown, gray, white

Know When to Use Color Blends

Asphalt shingle lines are produced in solid colors and blends. For example, CertainTeed Landmark shingles in Hunter Green show no variation. They’re just deep green.

CertainTeed Landmark Hunter Green

By contrast, Landmark Heather Blend shingles are a mix of several brown tones and rust too.

Landmark Heather Blend

Owens Corning Duration Designer shingles in multiple blends are even more varied.

Duration Designer Shingles Aged Copper

Now, here’s the blending principle: The plainer the siding is, the more a blended color pattern is needed to make your home look interesting and appealing.

A solid black roof on a home with dark brown wood siding creates a boring combination.

The same home with shingles that have a charcoal base but flecked with greens, tans and browns would be far more appealing.

On the other hand, if your home’s siding is varied – perhaps brick featuring multiple shades or an elegant stone front with varied colors – then color-blended shingles with clash.

You wouldn’t wear a patterned shirt with a patterned skirt or pants, right? Go solid on the roof when the home shows variation.

Here’s an example of Landmark Driftwood shingles that fail in this regard. The result is a busy clash. The colors aren’t coordinated either.

Shingle colors clashing with the house exterior

The stone veneer on the house above is arguably quite busy, and so is the roof. The plain white color on the rest of the house helps to balance the appearance, though.

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